How to mine bitcoin with your Raspberry Pi | Packt Hub

[Offer] Data Analysis, Bots, Web Scrapers & Automation Software

Hello!
I'm offering my programming services to develop affordable solutions to common tasks such as:
All the solutions are coded in Python 3 in compliance with best practices and PEP 8.
The scripts are cross platform compatible, you can also schedule them using crontab on a Linux VPS or Raspberry PI and Windows Task Scheduler.
Prices are affordable and payments can be made via PayPal.
Delivery time is often 1-2 business days depending on project difficulty.

Examples

Data Analysis Services

I am also offering Data Analysis services, which cover the process of collecting your dataset and your requirements to cleaning, modeling, exploring and communicating the results.
You will receive a report in a PDF file which will contain graphs, plots, tables and insights.
It is preferred that your dataset is in csv, xls or xlsx format. SQL and NoSQL are also acceptable.
If needed I will sign your NDA at no additional cost.
Delivery time and costs depend on your requirements, this will be handled in number of 'questions'. Each 'question' will be answered with the most appropiate graph, a table and a text explanation.
Some examples of 'questions' are:

Examples

Approximate Costs of Most Requested Tasks

Task Description Approximate Cost (USD) Approximate Delivery Time
Simple Web Scraper A web scraper for websites that are well structured or for web APIs. $20.00 - $40.00 < 24 hours
Complex Web Scraper A web scraper for websites that are not well structured and require a complex spider or managing user sessions. Also for web scrapers that require to rotate proxies and user agents. Starts at $40.00 < 24 hours
Selenium Web ScrapeAutomation A web scraper developed using Selenium WebDriver. Required for the most complex websites, it can include support for proxy rotation. Starts at $100.00 24 - 48 hours
Simple Reddit/TwitteDiscord (webhook) bot A bot that monitors subreddits/users/hashtags/websites and performs a predefined action. $30.00 - $50.00 < 24 hours
Complex Reddit/Discord bot A bot that takes commands and performs actions with the given parameters. The number of commands and their complexity increases the cost. Starts at $100.00 24 - 72 hours
Data Transformation Tool A script that performs transformation tasks on your datasets and raw text files such as extracting, cleaning, renaming, concatenating, removing duplicates, etc. $20.00 - $50.00 < 24 hours
Data Analysis (5 questions) A report in PDF which will contain graphs, plots, tables and insights from your dataset. $100.00 48 - 72 hours
Costs are influenced by the complexity of the given task and the quality of the target website. Feel free to ask any questions here or via PM.
Website | GitHub
submitted by Agent_Phantom to slavelabour [link] [comments]

[For Hire] Data Analysis, Bots, Web Scrapers & Automation Software

Hello!
I'm offering my programming services to develop affordable solutions to common tasks such as:
All the solutions are coded in Python 3 in compliance with best practices and PEP 8.
The scripts are cross platform compatible, you can also schedule them using crontab on a Linux VPS or Raspberry PI and Windows Task Scheduler.
Prices are affordable and payments can be made via PayPal.
Delivery time is often 1-2 business days depending on project difficulty.

Examples

Data Analysis Services

I am also offering Data Analysis services, which cover the process of collecting your dataset and your requirements to cleaning, modeling, exploring and communicating the results.
You will receive a report in a PDF file which will contain graphs, plots, tables and insights.
It is preferred that your dataset is in csv, xls or xlsx format. SQL and NoSQL are also acceptable.
If needed I will sign your NDA at no additional cost.
Delivery time and costs depend on your requirements, this will be handled in number of 'questions'. Each 'question' will be answered with the most appropiate graph, a table and a text explanation.
Some examples of 'questions' are:

Examples

Approximate Costs of Most Requested Tasks

Task Description Approximate Cost (USD) Approximate Delivery Time
Simple Web Scraper A web scraper for websites that are well structured or for web APIs. $20.00 - $40.00 < 24 hours
Complex Web Scraper A web scraper for websites that are not well structured and require a complex spider or managing user sessions. Also for web scrapers that require to rotate proxies and user agents. Starts at $40.00 < 24 hours
Selenium Web ScrapeAutomation A web scraper developed using Selenium WebDriver. Required for the most complex websites, it can include support for proxy rotation. Starts at $100.00 24 - 48 hours
Simple Reddit/TwitteDiscord (webhook) bot A bot that monitors subreddits/users/hashtags/websites and performs a predefined action. $30.00 - $50.00 < 24 hours
Complex Reddit/Discord bot A bot that takes commands and performs actions with the given parameters. The number of commands and their complexity increases the cost. Starts at $100.00 24 - 72 hours
Data Transformation Tool A script that performs transformation tasks on your datasets and raw text files such as extracting, cleaning, renaming, concatenating, removing duplicates, etc. $20.00 - $50.00 < 24 hours
Data Analysis (5 questions) A report in PDF which will contain graphs, plots, tables and insights from your dataset. $100.00 48 - 72 hours
Costs are influenced by the complexity of the given task and the quality of the target website. Feel free to ask any questions here or via PM.
Website | GitHub
submitted by Agent_Phantom to forhire [link] [comments]

[For Hire] Data Analysis, Bots, Web Scrapers & Automation Software

Hello!
I'm offering my programming services to develop affordable solutions to common tasks such as:
All the solutions are coded in Python 3 in compliance with best practices and PEP 8.
The scripts are cross platform compatible, you can also schedule them using crontab on a Linux VPS or Raspberry PI and Windows Task Scheduler.
Prices are affordable and payments can be made via PayPal.
Delivery time is often 1-2 business days depending on project difficulty.

Examples

Data Analysis Services

I am also offering Data Analysis services, which cover the process of collecting your dataset and your requirements to cleaning, modeling, exploring and communicating the results.
You will receive a report in a PDF file which will contain graphs, plots, tables and insights.
It is preferred that your dataset is in csv, xls or xlsx format. SQL and NoSQL are also acceptable.
If needed I will sign your NDA at no additional cost.
Delivery time and costs depend on your requirements, this will be handled in number of 'questions'. Each 'question' will be answered with the most appropiate graph, a table and a text explanation.
Some examples of 'questions' are:

Examples

Approximate Costs of Most Requested Tasks

Task Description Approximate Cost (USD) Approximate Delivery Time
Simple Web Scraper A web scraper for websites that are well structured or for web APIs. $20.00 - $40.00 < 24 hours
Complex Web Scraper A web scraper for websites that are not well structured and require a complex spider or managing user sessions. Also for web scrapers that require to rotate proxies and user agents. Starts at $40.00 < 24 hours
Selenium Web ScrapeAutomation A web scraper developed using Selenium WebDriver. Required for the most complex websites, it can include support for proxy rotation. Starts at $100.00 24 - 48 hours
Simple Reddit/TwitteDiscord (webhook) bot A bot that monitors subreddits/users/hashtags/websites and performs a predefined action. $30.00 - $50.00 < 24 hours
Complex Reddit/Discord bot A bot that takes commands and performs actions with the given parameters. The number of commands and their complexity increases the cost. Starts at $100.00 24 - 72 hours
Data Transformation Tool A script that performs transformation tasks on your datasets and raw text files such as extracting, cleaning, renaming, concatenating, removing duplicates, etc. $20.00 - $50.00 < 24 hours
Data Analysis (5 questions) A report in PDF which will contain graphs, plots, tables and insights from your dataset. $100.00 48 - 72 hours
Costs are influenced by the complexity of the given task and the quality of the target website. Feel free to ask any questions here or via PM.
Website | GitHub
submitted by Agent_Phantom to jobbit [link] [comments]

My career isn’t always dangerous, but clients can be unpredictable

My name is Amy, and I’m what’s called a Computer Dominatrix. My clients are all long distance, we never interact face-to-face, and I have control over all of them. Some give me absolute control, some give me specific portions with boundaries. Some are married or dating, others are single. They all make use of my talents to give up control of at least part of their lives.
When a new client contacts me, we exchange a few messages so I have some background about them, and I lay out what my services usually entail. I tell a few stories of what other clients have asked me to do for them, to help the new client select scenarios they would like to set up. Most of my clients have never had a Digital Dom before. So, giving them a few examples and options helps bolster their confidence.
The usual set-up goes like this: my client installs some spyware on their computer that I control. It gives me the power to do things like lock their computer, see their screen, disable the keyboard, take over control of their computer, and get reports of what they’re doing on their computer. With this tool, I can perform my services.
Some clients want me to watch their bank statements and shame them if they spend too much money or buy surprise things with their money as if I own the account. Other clients want me to monitor their porn usage and shame them for what they look up. Or, if I log in and catch them using porn, I should direct them to different porn of my choosing and force them to watch that instead. One even wanted me to try and break into his computer and install the spyware secretly. That was a fun client to work with.
When it comes down to it, they just want to relinquish a little control over their lives. I understand where their desires come from, and knowing it helps me be a better Dom.
Contrasting the fun times of my career, I’ve had a few mishaps and horrible things happen.
I had one client sign up for my services. We messaged a few times to get to know one another before I agreed to accept him as a client. He was in his mid thirties, single, and wanted me to watch him look at porn and make random comments on the things he was watching.
Really, not that abnormal for my choice of career.
I had him sign an agreement that helps me avoid legal trouble if they try to report me for hacking (had this happen before), and we got started. I gave him the url where he could install my personal spyware, and he followed through.
He only asked that I give him a little advance notice before I start watching, which I agreed to. Boundaries are important.
I would check up on him twice a week, and send him a message before I did saying “I’m coming to check on you in ten minutes, you better be watching something good.” I would log in ten minutes later to the second and start either shaming him for his choice of videos or praise him for making the “right” choice. All of this was predetermined.
Things were going fine with this client, and I balanced him with about 10 others. Being a Digital Dom makes it easy to spread your attention across many clients. Bonus if you can get clients from different time zones so they would log in at different times so you don’t have to multitask.
I was about to check in with another client, when I mis-clicked in my software. See, my spyware (which I paid to be custom written after wishing for more features in commercial tools) lists my clients by most recently connected in one screen. When I add a new client, it can mess with the order of the page I am so used to mindlessly clicking through. I’ve since paid for that to get fixed and sort clients alphabetically, but this time I made a mistake.
I clicked on this new client and connected to his computer.
A gasp escaped my lips as I saw what he was looking at. I’ll leave that up to your imagination. It was some of the most fucked up porn I’ve ever seen. Involving victims of questionable age. And blood.
If I could have slipped out of there, I would have. But this client requested a popup to appear whenever I connected so he would know I was there.
That popup revealed my unexpected presence.
Instead of panicking and trying to close the window, he calmly moved his mouse to the task bar and opened a text document. I was frozen while watching him type. I should have logged straight out, but I instead started to open a voice channel to tell him I was dropping him as a client.
It was too much for me, and I decided to set that boundary early on in my career.
“Like what you see?”
He had typed into the word document, and the cursor blinked impatiently at me.
I thought my voice would crack, so I took over the keyboard and typed back.
“I’m sorry, but I’m going to refund your money and no longer service you. Please uninstall this software and watch for your refund.”
He paused for a while, and I waited for him to respond once before I disconnected. He took too long, so I closed the window and took a deep breath while sitting back.
I was feeling really disconcerted from what I’d watched. It wasn’t the first time a client had tried to show me illegal things during a session, but it always makes me sick when they do. I gave the reins over to another Digital Dom I have partnered with. We take over for each other if we feel ill or something. Just temporarily.
I went to take a shower to wash out those images.
 
My computer started acting up more than a month later. So much had gone on since dropping that client that I didn’t connect the two at first.
The computer would slow down for a few minutes, then resume its normal speed. I assumed it was because I hadn’t restarted in a while, so I restarted it. That seemed to fix the problem.
When I had rebooted, the wifi slowed down considerably, enough for my roommate, Jess, to ask if I was downloading anything big. I had logged into the router to see if that also needed to be restarted when I noticed a device I didn’t recognize was connected to the wifi.
I swallowed hard.
RASPI was the name of the connected device. It had connected to the network three days ago.
Some strangers' device was on our network. And they had to be nearby, at least within range of wifi. I immediately suspected that a neighbor had brute forced our wifi password and was now stealing internet.
Before kicking the device off, I looked at the router’s traffic report. The device had a significant size of traffic in the last few days, but my computer used the most out of all of our devices. The device came in 5th place for most data used.
It made sense that my computer was using so much bandwidth, but 75+ gigabytes in 3 days was excessive.
My throat seized, and I immediately reached around to the back of my computer and unplugged the ethernet cable.
Deep, primal panic set in. This was a very specific attack. It’s not the kind of hacking you can do en masse to install some ransomware or adware.
Someone was targeting me or both of us.
Someone who was willing to spend time brute forcing a wifi password and going after one specific machine on the network.
 
I called Lucas, the guy I hired to write my spyware for me, and filled him in on everything I knew. He knows perfectly well what his software is used for and isn’t weird about it. He agreed to take a look at my computer for a fee.
So, trusting him as I have all my career, I installed a commercial remote desktop tool and let him connect. The moment I reconnected the computer to the internet, the router showed a spike in traffic again.
I had him on a call while he worked, and I watched what he did carefully, trying my best to learn what he was doing so I could troubleshoot myself if this ever happened again.
“Oh shit,” Lucas muttered. He had a traffic analyzer and computer process analyzer open on-screen. “Amy, I think you got hacked. Like, they’re downloading your hard drive!”
“They’re what?!” I began to really panic. I had a lot of my clients information on this machine. Keys that let me log into their machines. Bitcoin Cash addresses and keys where I stored my fees.
Now someone had them. They could easily start stealing and spending my thousands in accumulated fees and harass my clients.
I’d lose a big chunk of my savings and my livelihood.
Immediately, I took over the computer and shut Lucas out while I created new crypto addresses and started transferring money. The fees from transferring would make me lose a little money, but it was better than losing it all.
I also started backing up the hard drive to several USB drives I had lying around. Just the important stuff like my files, personal photos, and client info.
When I let Lucas back in, he got to work finding the process that was exfiltrating my data and shutting it down. He tracked down the executable that was running the show and downloaded it to his own computer before deleting it from mine.
He promised to dissect it as best he could to figure out what it was doing.
Before he did that, however, he started monitoring my system to make sure the virus had been truly cleared out.
While watching my system, he gave me a task.
“Walk around your apartment. Search everywhere and look for that rogue device. It’s been continuously connected for days, which means whoever is doing this is probably not camped out on the road. From the name, I’d guess it’s a Raspberry Pi -- a small computer about the size of a phone but two inches tall.”
He sent me a picture of the type of device we were looking for.
“They probably left it hidden somewhere, either connected to an outlet or with a large battery pack. Go and look for it,” he insisted.
I got Jess to help me search the place top to bottom. Nothing. Not even outside in the bushes or on the back porch.
We split up and went to our neighbors, asking if they’d seen anyone suspicious hanging around the building in the last week. No one on our floor had. I went upstairs and asked the same questions.
Our upstairs neighbor said the only person he’d seen was a guy coming to update their satellite dish on the balcony. My throat seized up as I realized that could be them.
I asked hesitantly if I could look at their dish. I didn’t know them, but briefly explained that someone had left a device lying around that was breaking into our wifi and that our next step was to call the police.
They panicked at that, and let me check their balcony if I promised to keep them out of it if I called the cops. I agreed, knowing full well that they did drugs and would hate for the police to come around the apartment complex.
There, on the balcony, was exactly what Lucas had told me to look for. A black box sat along the wall between the satellite and the wall the cable ran into. A power cord exited the box and connected to an outlet on the balcony.
I cracked open the box with my fingers and found a circuit board inside, connected via usb to the outlet. The satellite cable passed straight through the box without connecting to anything. The box was a fake, made to look like it was doing something to the cable as it passed through.
The circuit board looked exactly like the picture Lucas had shown me.
There was our rogue device.
I unplugged the device, fully aware that unplugging it would alert whoever was controlling it. They could assume it was disconnected accidentally, or they would think I had found it. Either way, I couldn’t just leave it.
I thanked the neighbors and left with the whole box. Jess met me on the stairs, saying that Lucas had asked her to disconnect the internet on the computer and have me call him back.
Jess stared in wide-eyed shock as I showed her what I’d found. The upstairs neighbors were well within range of our wifi for the device to connect. The job was only barely sloppy enough to detect. We were lucky I had found it at all.
 
On the phone Lucas sounded panicked.
“They didn’t just copy your hard drive, they added files to it,” he squeaked. “Bad files. Bad pictures.”
My jaw tightened, and I felt sick. I made the connection to the client I’d dropped.
“Delete all your shit now,” Lucas was demanding. “You already backed up what you want, you need to destroy that hard drive. Smash it, burn it, bury it. Go get a new hard drive. Start as fresh as you can. I can help you get set back up if you want.”
“I think I know what’ll happen,” I muttered. “He’ll call the police on me and tip them off that I have those… pictures. They’ll find it and arrest me for possession. Game over.”
“He? You know who it is?” Lucas pressed.
I told him about the client I’d dropped.
“That’s why you need to torch your hard drives. Now. Both of you. Same with your phones. Who knows where else he’s been,” was Lucas’ advice.
I won’t confirm or deny what I did with the hard drive or the device. If I destroyed it, it would technically be destruction of evidence.
I ordered a new hard drive and reinstalled everything. I explained to my clients that I had lost internet connection for a couple of days, and didn’t end up losing any clients.
I haven’t told the police everything. The last time I got involved with them, there was so much harassment from them about my career that I’d rather not have more negative interactions with them. It just isn’t worth it in this case. I kept my report short and simple: a guy I met online and dumped might try something and come to my house. I gave them the information the client gave me, but I suspect more and more that it was fake.
Making a report will help if anything new happens.
I’ve written about this before on other anonymous forums, specifically for other Doms. Because of those posts, a few journalists have reached out and are writing features based on me, my career, and these events. They should be published in the next few days.
I’m just interested in sharing stories like this as publicly as possible, for awareness.
Lucas explained that the Raspberry Pi was a tiny computer that had a cellular connection so the client could connect to it from anywhere in the world and try to break into my wifi. Once he had succeeded, the client had gone to work breaking into my computer and getting their malware installed. We still don’t know 100% how he did it.
Lucas worked tirelessly to revise his software and remove vulnerabilities that could be used to trace me. We don’t know which vulnerabilities the client used, if any. We do know that there is one left, however.
I know this because every once in a while, a client will show up in my software who I didn’t sign up. A new name and data every time. I don’t dare click it. I just know what will be waiting for me upon connection.
“Like what you see?”
Lucas hasn’t been able to track down how he’s injecting fake clients into the software. Until Lucas can fix it, all I can do is click carefully and not connect again by accident. I’m sure the client is using a modified version of my spyware, ready to do all kinds of damage the moment I connect.
The guy is clearly an expert. Who knows how many other people he’s done something like this to. One thing is certain: he was prepared to conduct this attack.
My career isn’t always dangerous, but the clients can be unpredictable.
submitted by DigitDom to nosleep [link] [comments]

Why Runelite's GPU renderer is one of the most important improvements to OSRS ever.

In a world of "gameplay versus graphics", a GPU renderer improves both

Not only does this new GPU renderer improve game responsiveness and framerate by a huge amount, but it's going to be so radically more efficient that it can afford to have longer draw distances. Not just this, but these distant map tiles will be clickable! Very exciting - every single task, skill, and activity will be smoother and more enjoyable.
Disclaimer: This language and information has been simplified for average gamers. Go away, sweaty "AKTHUALLY" brainlets.

OSRS currently uses a CPU renderer straight out of 2003

It's really REALLY bad! At least, by modern standards. It could not be more opposite to what modern computers pursue. It's not Jagex's fault, it's just old... Very VERY old! It's a huge undertaking, and Jagex has been too busy knocking mobile absolutely out of the park, and I'd do the same if I were them - so don't think this is some kind of rag on Jagex. Anyways, some may be surprised that this renderer is still managing to hurt computers today. How can software first written in 2003-2004 (FOR COMPUTERS OF THAT ERA) be laggy and stuttery on computers today? The answer is simple: resizable mode, and individual CPU core speed.
Resizable mode takes a game window that used to be 765x503 (the majority of which used to be a fixed GUI canvas, but not with the new mode!) and renders it at resolutions as high as 3840x2160, maybe even higher. Do you know how many pixels that is? Over 8 million. Do you know how many pixels the original renderer was designed to expect? Just under 390,000. That's over 21x the work being thrown at modern CPUs. Cores aren't anywhere near 21x faster than they were at the close of the single-core era, which is why players with 4k monitors need to see therapists after long play sessions.
Surely CPUs have gotten faster since the mid 2000s! They have, but not quite in the way that a single-threaded(single core) CPU renderer would expect... CPU manufacturers have been focusing on power draw, temperatures, core count, and special architectural improvements like GPU integration and controller integration. Comparatively, improving individual core speed hasn't been as much of a focus as it had been prior to the multi-core era -and no, I'm not talking about the useless gigahertz(TM) meme measurement, I'm talking about actual overall work done by the core. As a result, the CPUs we have today have developed down a much different path than what this CPU renderer would benefit from. Not nearly the amount that resizable mode demands. Especially considering these CPU cores were designed to assume that things didn't pile all their work onto just one core.
We're throwing over 21x the work at CPUs that, in most cases, have only been getting 5-15% faster per-core performance every year.

What is a "frame"?

Think of a frame as a painting. Your GPU renderer (or CPU cough cough) is responsible for using your GPU to paint an empty canvas, and turn it into a beautiful and complete picture. First, it draws the skybox(if there is one, it's gonna just fill with black in the case of OSRS). Then, it draws all the visible geometry from back to front, with all the lighting and effects. Then, it draws the GUI elements over the top. It does everything, one pixel at a time. Its job is to draw these paintings as quickly as possible (ideally, so you perceive movement) and present them to your monitor, one at a time, forever... until you close the game. Think of a GPU renderer as a talented artist with hundreds of arms (GPU cores).
If your GPU is able to paint this picture in 16.6 milliseconds (frame time measurements are always in milliseconds), then you'll have a frame rate of 60 frames per second, as 1000 ms / 16.6 is 60. Sometimes your renderer struggles, though. Sometimes it can only complete a frame in 100 milliseconds (10FPS). You can't wave a magic want when this happens. If you want a higher framerate, you need to either update your hardware, or change your software. By change software, I mean either make it more efficient at the work it's told to do, or give it less work. RuneLite has done the former. An example of the latter would be lowering resolution, turning graphical details down, turning off filtering, etc. Games usually call this set of controls the "Graphics settings". Luckily, OSRS is so lightweight it will likely never need a graphics settings menu.
(Think of a CPU renderer as a painter with no artistic ability and, in the case of quad core, four arms...but he's only allowed to paint with one, while the other 3 sit idle. Also, he has to constantly stop painting to return to his normal duties! No fun! The CPU is better off at its own desk, letting the GPU handle the painting.)

A GPU renderer improves frame rates

Not that this matters currently, as the game is capped at 50FPS anyways... but it's still going to be huge for low-end systems or high-end systems with high res monitors. There's also the future, though... Once a GPU renderer is out, it could be possible that they could someday uncap the framerate (which, according to mod atlas, is only the character's camera as all animations are 2FPS anyways).
I expect that an update like this will make fixed mode a solid 50FPS on literally everything capable of executing the game. Fixed mode was already easy to run on everything except for old netbooks and Windows Vista desktops, so this really wouldn't be a surprise.

A GPU renderer improves frame times

Frame times are just as important as frame rates. Your frame rate is how many frames are drawn over the course of a second. But, as described previously, each "painting" is done individually. Sometimes the painter takes longer to do something! What if there's a glowing projectile flying past the camera, or something else momentary that's intensive? The painter has to take the time to paint that, resulting in a handful of frames over the course of that second taking much more time than the others. When your frame rate is high and frame times are consistent, this is perceived as incredibly smooth motion.
Ideally, all of our frames are completed in the same amount of time, but this isn't the case. Sometimes "distractions" will come up, and cause the painter to devote an extra 10-20ms to it before returning to the rest of the painting. In bad scenarios, this actually becomes visible, and is referred to as micro stutter. Having a dedicated GPU renderer doing the work ensures this is very uncommon. A GPU has hundreds or thousands of cores. If some get distracted, others reach out and pick up the workload. Everything is smooth, distributed, and uninterrupted.
You may recall Mod Atlas talking about frame times when he posted about his GPU renderer last year: https://twitter.com/JagexAtlas/status/868131325114552321
Notice the part where he says it takes 25+ms on the CPU, but only takes 4-5ms on the GPU! That's 200-250 frames per second, if the framerate were uncapped! Also, side note: Just because a frame is completed in 1ms doesn't always mean your framerate will be 1000FPS. If your framerate is capped, then the painter will sit and wait after completing and presenting a frame until it's time to start painting again. This is why capping your framerate can be good for power usage, as demonstrated on mobile! Your GPU can't suck up your battery if it's asleep 90% of the time!

A GPU renderer is more efficient

Instead of piling all computational workloads and graphical workloads onto one single CPU core (rest in peace 8+ core users), a GPU renderer takes graphical work off the CPU and does it itself. I'd estimate the majority of all the work was graphical, so this will make a pretty noticeable difference in performance, especially on older systems. Before, having OSRS open while using other software would have a noticeable performance impact on everything. Especially on older computers. Not anymore! CPUs will run cooler, software will run better, and your computer may even use less power overall, since GPUs are much better at efficient graphical work than CPUs are!

All computers are already equipped to run this very VERY well

Most of the computers we have today are designed with two things: a good GPU, and an okay CPU. This isn't 2003 anymore. GPUs have made their way into everything, and they're prioritized over CPUs. They're not used just for games anymore, entire operating systems rely on them not just for animations and graphical effects, but entire computing tasks. GPUs are responsible for everything from facial recognition to Bitcoin mining these days. Not having a good one in your computer will leave you with a pretty frustrating experience - which is why every manufacturer makes sure you have one. Now, thanks to RuneLite, these will no longer be sitting idle while your poor CPU burns itself alive.

This new GPU renderer will make OSRS run much better on low end systems

Low end systems are notorious for having garbage like Intel Atom or Celeron in them. Their GPU is alright, but the CPU is absolutely terrible. Using the GPU will give them a boost from 5-15FPS in fixed mode, to around 50. At least, assuming they were made after the GPGPU revolution around 2010.

This new GPU renderer will make OSRS run much better on high end systems

High end systems tend to have huge GPUs and huge monitors. Right now, your GPU is asleep while your 4k monitor brings the current CPU renderer to its knees, on the verge of committing sudoku. Letting your GPU take on all that work will make your big and beautiful monitor handle OSRS without lag or stutter.

This new GPU renderer will open the possibility of plugins that build on top of it

One that comes to mind is a 2x/3x/4x GUI scaler. Scaling things in a graphics API is much easier than scaling it in some convoluded custom CPU renderer that was first designed to run in Internet Explorer 5.

It's easier to customize graphical variables in a GPU renderer than it is a glitchy old CPU renderer

Want night time? Change the light intensity. Want cel-shaded comic book appearance for some stupid reason? It's easy. Want to hit 60FPS on a Raspberry Pi? Change your render distance to 2 tiles. Now that the graphical work has been offloaded to a graphics API that's been literally designed to easily modify these things, the sky is the limit. See my past posts on this topic:
Big round of applause for the RuneLite team, and Jagex for allowing them to continue development. Without RuneLite, OSRS would be half the game it is today. Here's to their continued success, with or without Jagex integrating their code into the main game!
submitted by Tizaki to 2007scape [link] [comments]

Your guide to NYZO

NYZO is the highly efficient Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) blockchain for everyday spending.
NYZO has been developed from the ground up, it is an open-source initiative and isn't a copy of any existing blockchain project.
The network has been running for more then one year now and the source code can be found on GitHub. The NYZO codebase is going to start acting as an API server. This will be run-mode dependent, just like the various web server functions that are available now. It will interact with the mesh on one side and whatever it needs to interact with on the other side.
Developers update NYZO all the time with fixes and performance and stability improvements. Every update which has been created for the network so far has been accompanied by a release note, a detailed document detailing every change to the network to make it better.
We can find these release notes on the website of the developers: What's new? - as you can see, the network has been worked on on a regular basis and each release note is multiple pages long - developers are dedicated to making this a success and this is their testament.
Whitepaper 
Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) consensus mechanism requires active participation in the form of time and verifier behaviour in the blockchain to be allowed to exert a certain influence on the system as a whole. The Proof-of-Diversity blockchain uses verification cycles to establish the authoritative form of the blockchain. The basic concept of proof-of-diversity is simple. Verifiers take turns producing blocks in a circular order. Some simple rules ensure that verifiers are neither added to nor removed from that circular order too quickly. In order to produce a believable forgery of the blockchain for any meaningful amount of time, an attacker would need to obtain more than half of the private keys of verifiers currently working on the blockchain. The design and technology are simple and clearly explained in NYZO whitepaper. This document was created in the very beginning and it might not cover all aspects as it should, the release notes make up for this.
Still too lazy and didn't read NYZO whitepaper? Relax, and listen to the soothing audio version.
Verifier 
Mesh (cycle) participants are called verifiers. Verifiers are in charge of verifying transactions and producing blocks. In exchange for securing the network, verifiers collect transaction fees which are distributed fairly among all of them. Each verifier gets a chance to verify one block in one mesh cycle. NYZO don't need mining equipment and large amounts of processing power like others, only unique IP address and always on Linux VPS is required.
Sentinel 
The purpose of the NYZO Sentinel is to provide improve stability of the cycle by producing blocks for in-cycle verifiers that are unable to produce blocks due to temporary hardware and network issues. The Sentinel should not be run on an instance that is running the verifier. The NYZO sentinel is a seperate version of the nyzoVerifier designed to protect your in-cycle verifiers. Its job is to constantly check up on your verifiers. If one of them is unresponsive, the sentinel will initiate communication on behalf of the verifier, this all to ensure future cycle inclusion.
The Mesh (cycle) 
is simply a network of computers known as verifiers all running NYZO and communicating information to each other. The Mesh (cycle) is a central point of PoD system. For securing the Mesh these computers are given 10% reward of transaction fees for each block they secure.
Check your NYZO verifier status, search for your nickname or IP
Newcomers can sometimes get confused with how Nyzo verifier lifecycle works in practice or how to join the cycle.
Block files 
One part of the consensus algorithm is the block consolidation process which ensures that a small machine such as a Rock64 Pro or a beefy Raspberry Pi can run a NYZO verifier with little storage space. 1000 blocks are consolidated into 500 Kb of storage space. Very efficient.
51% attack resistance and energy efficiency 
NYZO has a properly designed economic model that relies on time. Therefore, the cost for 51% attacks (relative to market cap) is huge, there is ongoing incentive to participate in the network, and attacks based on computing power (PoW) or ownership of token (PoS) aren't feasible. NYZO uses only a tiny fraction of Bitcoin’s resources while performing the same tasks. 58 000 000 000 kwH - 58 TWh : current BTC power cons. per year vs 36500 kwH - 0.0000365 TWh : current NYZO power cons. per year = 1,589,041 times more efficient and 51% attack resistant.
Roadmap 
NYZO developers have been asked many times for a roadmap. The roadmap is to keep making the code more stable, more robust, and more efficient.
Nyzo development: 15 months of hard work (and beyond)
Scalability 
NYZO doesn’t require any Layer 2 scaling solutions and is able to handle high transaction volumes per second which is only dependent on the performance of the verifiers in the mesh. The block time is 7 seconds and block size is 28 Kb.
Micropay is a lightweight way of using NYZO that shifts as much burden as possible to the person receiving the payment to make it as easy as possible for someone to send small payments. Next step is an API server for Micropay.
Useful guides and articles 
2k verifiers/nodes are in the cycle and 24k verifiers are patiently waiting to join the mesh/cycle. Following video tutorials will explain in detail how to set up your own NYZO mesh verifier node. For more information about set up visit Nyzo DISCORD.
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to setup a NYZO verifier and sentinel on a VPS - video tutorial from Refortuna Analytics
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to set up a Nyzo Verifier on Hetzner - from community website Nyzo.io
Nyzo review and guide how to set up verifier - very detailed review and guide by MyAltcoins.info
Nyzo - Time and diversity as a currency (+ 4 translations here) This article goes into detail about the consensus algorithm and its benefits, it sketches a hypothetical attack scenario and the cost of an attack at this point in time (while the market cap is still low).
Arguments against early entrants This article goes into detail about the early stages of the project, what has happened, how certain events have unfolded and the diversity of the project, it creates a parallel between Bitcoin and NYZO to cover an important aspect of the network in detail.
Time An article going deeper into the time aspect of the network, written by a community member
Ethereum An article comparing NYZO’s consensus algorithm to the development state of Ethereum, written by the same user as the article above.
Bitcoin Yet again an article comparing NYZO, this time with Bitcoin.
Proof of Diversity - A novel solution for limitless blockchain scalability | Micky.com.au
Thoughts on Tor and Nyzo
Developer fund 
The initial developer fund plan can be found here, this has been followed up and the details have changed. The developers effectively own 0.6% of the total supply. So far around 11 million has been “mined” and the remainder is spendable by the network through governed voting, with a minimum amount of votes required for NYZO to be released (51% of the network needs to agree).
IMPORTANT LINKS: 
Official website
Nyzo mobile wallet for Android phones on Google Play - Multilingual support (EN, DE, CN, ES, FR, RU, NL, HR) - developed by ThreeDots Technologies
Nyzo key tool and Web wallet
Nyzo Space - Paper wallet - developed by Angainor Dev
Nyzo DISCORD - There are currently 1600 active members and developers in the discord group with multiple joining every day. Most of the community communicates here. Here is where you’re guaranteed to have a one-on-one with the developers.
GitHub
New Community Forum website (You can get here lots of useful information. If you are ready to build for Nyzo and get paid, please read this article... Nyzo and its protocol which facilitates building)
Chinese Community website NYZO社区
Nyzo Twitter
Nyzo Gang Twitter
Facebook
Telegram
Instagram
Tumblr
Reddit
Bitcointalk
Weibo
QQ: 1007477423
Zedge
NYZO wallpapers for desktop and mobile devices
Trading: 
qTrade
BILAXY
Hotbit
QBTC
Citex
BiHodl


https://preview.redd.it/brh7hm2n6m241.png?width=2560&format=png&auto=webp&s=8d8b45235fcc34200bcad5603249ae49a89c2612
submitted by Mobilenewsflash to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

What is NYZO?

What is NYZO?
NYZO is a highly efficient Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) blockchain for everyday spending.
NYZO has been developed from the ground up, it is an open-source initiative and isn't a copy of any existing blockchain project.
The network has been running for more than one year now and the source code can be found on GitHub. The NYZO codebase is going to start acting as an API server. This will be run-mode dependent, just like the various web server functions that are available now. It will interact with the mesh on one side and whatever it needs to interact with on the other side.
Developers update NYZO all the time with fixes and performance and stability improvements. Every update which has been created for the network so far has been accompanied by a release note, a detailed document detailing every change to the network to make it better.
We can find these release notes on the website of the developers: What's new? - as you can see, the network has been worked on a regular basis and each release note is multiple pages long - developers are dedicated to making this a success and this is their testament.
Whitepaper 
Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) consensus mechanism requires active participation in the form of time and verifier behavior in the blockchain to be allowed to exert a certain influence on the system as a whole. The Proof-of-Diversity blockchain uses verification cycles to establish the authoritative form of the blockchain. The basic concept of proof-of-diversity is simple. Verifiers take turns producing blocks in a circular order. Some simple rules ensure that verifiers are neither added to nor removed from that circular order too quickly. In order to produce a believable forgery of the blockchain for any meaningful amount of time, an attacker would need to obtain more than half of the private keys of verifiers currently working on the blockchain. The design and technology are simple and clearly explained in NYZO whitepaper. This document was created in the very beginning and it might not cover all aspects as it should, the release notes make up for this.
Still too lazy and didn't read NYZO whitepaper? Relax, and listen to the soothing audio version.
Verifier 
Mesh (cycle) participants are called verifiers. Verifiers are in charge of verifying transactions and producing blocks. In exchange for securing the network, verifiers collect transaction fees which are distributed fairly among all of them. Each verifier gets a chance to verify one block in one mesh cycle. NYZO don't need mining equipment and large amounts of processing power like others, only unique IP address and always-on Linux VPS is required.
Sentinel 
The purpose of the NYZO Sentinel is to provide improved stability of the cycle by producing blocks for in-cycle verifiers that are unable to produce blocks due to temporary hardware and network issues. The Sentinel should not be run on an instance that is running the verifier. The NYZO sentinel is a separate version of the nyzoVerifier designed to protect your in-cycle verifiers. Its job is to constantly check up on your verifiers. If one of them is unresponsive, the sentinel will initiate communication on behalf of the verifier, this all to ensure future cycle inclusion.
The Mesh (cycle) 
is simply a network of computers known as verifiers all running NYZO and communicating information to each other. The Mesh (cycle) is a central point of PoD system. For securing the Mesh these computers are given a 10% reward of transaction fees for each block they secure.
Check your NYZO verifier status, search for your nickname or IP
Newcomers can sometimes get confused with how Nyzo verifier lifecycle works in practice or how to join the cycle.
Block files 
One part of the consensus algorithm is the block consolidation process which ensures that a small machine such as a Rock64 Pro or a beefy Raspberry Pi can run a NYZO verifier with little storage space. 1000 blocks are consolidated into 500 Kb of storage space. Very efficient.
51% attack resistance and energy efficiency 
NYZO has a properly designed economic model that relies on time. Therefore, the cost for 51% attacks (relative to market cap) is huge, there is ongoing incentive to participate in the network, and attacks based on computing power (PoW) or ownership of token (PoS) aren't feasible. NYZO uses only a tiny fraction of Bitcoin’s resources while performing the same tasks. 58 000 000 000 kWh - 58 TWh : current BTC power cons. per year vs 36500 kWh - 0.0000365 TWh : current NYZO power cons. per year = 1,589,041 times more efficient and 51% attack resistant.
Roadmap 
NYZO developers have been asked many times for a roadmap. The roadmap is to keep making the code more stable, more robust, and more efficient.
Nyzo development: 15 months of hard work (and beyond)
Scalability 
NYZO doesn’t require any Layer 2 scaling solutions and is able to handle high transaction volumes per second which is only dependent on the performance of the verifiers in the mesh. The block time is 7 seconds and block size is 28 Kb.
Micropay is a lightweight way of using NYZO that shifts as much burden as possible to the person receiving the payment to make it as easy as possible for someone to send small payments. Next step is an API server for Micropay.
Useful guides and articles 
2k verifiers/nodes are in the cycle and 24k verifiers are patiently waiting to join the mesh/cycle. The following video tutorials will explain in detail how to set up your own NYZO mesh verifier node. For more information about setting up please visit Nyzo DISCORD.
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to setup a NYZO verifier and sentinel on a VPS - video tutorial from Refortuna Analytics
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to set up a Nyzo Verifier on Hetzner - from community website Nyzo.io
Nyzo review and guide how to set up verifier - very detailed review and guide by MyAltcoins.info
Nyzo - Time and diversity as a currency (+ 4 translations here) This article goes into detail about the consensus algorithm and its benefits, it sketches a hypothetical attack scenario and the cost of an attack at this point in time (while the market cap is still low).
Arguments against early entrants This article goes into detail about the early stages of the project, what has happened, how certain events have unfolded and the diversity of the project, it creates a parallel between Bitcoin and NYZO to cover an important aspect of the network in detail.
Time An article going deeper into the time aspect of the network, written by a community member
Ethereum An article comparing NYZO’s consensus algorithm to the development state of Ethereum, written by the same user as the article above.
Bitcoin Yet again an article comparing NYZO, this time with Bitcoin.
Proof of Diversity - A novel solution for limitless blockchain scalability | Micky.com.au
Thoughts on Tor and Nyzo
Developer fund 
The initial developer fund plan can be found here, this has been followed up and the details have changed. The developers effectively own 0.6% of the total supply. So far around 11 million has been “mined” and the remainder is spendable by the network through governed voting, with a minimum amount of votes required for NYZO to be released (51% of the network needs to agree).
IMPORTANT LINKS: 
Official website
Nyzo.net
Nyzo.today
Nyzo.io
Nyzo mobile wallet for Android phones on Google Play - Multilingual support (EN, DE, CN, ES, FR, RU, NL, HR) - developed by ThreeDots Technologies
Nyzo key tool and Web wallet
Nyzo Space - Paper wallet - developed by Angainor Dev
Nyzo DISCORD - There are currently 1600 active members and developers in the discord group with multiple joining every day. Most of the community communicates here. Here is where you’re guaranteed to have a one-on-one with the developers.
GitHub
New Community Forum website (You can get here lots of useful information. If you are ready to build for Nyzo and get paid, please read this article... Nyzo and its protocol which facilitates building)
Chinese Community website NYZO社区
Nyzo Twitter
Nyzo Gang Twitter
Facebook
Telegram
Instagram
Tumblr
Reddit
Bitcointalk
Weibo
QQ: 1007477423
WeChat: Nyzo
Zedge
NYZO wallpapers for desktop and mobile devices
Trading: 
qTrade
BILAXY
HOTBIT
QBTC
Citex
BiHodl

https://preview.redd.it/brh7hm2n6m241.png?width=2560&format=png&auto=webp&s=8d8b45235fcc34200bcad5603249ae49a89c2612
submitted by Mobilenewsflash to Nyzo [link] [comments]

Your Guide to NYZO

Your Guide to NYZO
NYZO is the highly efficient Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) blockchain for everyday spending.
NYZO has been developed from the ground up, it is an open-source initiative and isn't a copy of any existing blockchain project.
The network has been running for more then one year now and the source code can be found on GitHub. The NYZO codebase is going to start acting as an API server. This will be run-mode dependent, just like the various web server functions that are available now. It will interact with the mesh on one side and whatever it needs to interact with on the other side.
Developers update NYZO all the time with fixes and performance and stability improvements. Every update which has been created for the network so far has been accompanied by a release note, a detailed document detailing every change to the network to make it better.
We can find these release notes on the website of the developers: What's new? - as you can see, the network has been worked on on a regular basis and each release note is multiple pages long - developers are dedicated to making this a success and this is their testament.
Whitepaper 
Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) consensus mechanism requires active participation in the form of time and verifier behaviour in the blockchain to be allowed to exert a certain influence on the system as a whole. The Proof-of-Diversity blockchain uses verification cycles to establish the authoritative form of the blockchain. The basic concept of proof-of-diversity is simple. Verifiers take turns producing blocks in a circular order. Some simple rules ensure that verifiers are neither added to nor removed from that circular order too quickly. In order to produce a believable forgery of the blockchain for any meaningful amount of time, an attacker would need to obtain more than half of the private keys of verifiers currently working on the blockchain. The design and technology are simple and clearly explained in NYZO whitepaper. This document was created in the very beginning and it might not cover all aspects as it should, the release notes make up for this.
Still too lazy and didn't read NYZO whitepaper? Relax, and listen to the soothing audio version.
Verifier 
Mesh (cycle) participants are called verifiers. Verifiers are in charge of verifying transactions and producing blocks. In exchange for securing the network, verifiers collect transaction fees which are distributed fairly among all of them. Each verifier gets a chance to verify one block in one mesh cycle. NYZO don't need mining equipment and large amounts of processing power like others, only unique IP address and always on Linux VPS is required.
Sentinel 
The purpose of the NYZO Sentinel is to provide improve stability of the cycle by producing blocks for in-cycle verifiers that are unable to produce blocks due to temporary hardware and network issues. The Sentinel should not be run on an instance that is running the verifier. The NYZO sentinel is a seperate version of the nyzoVerifier designed to protect your in-cycle verifiers. Its job is to constantly check up on your verifiers. If one of them is unresponsive, the sentinel will initiate communication on behalf of the verifier, this all to ensure future cycle inclusion.
The Mesh (cycle) 
is simply a network of computers known as verifiers all running NYZO and communicating information to each other. The Mesh (cycle) is a central point of PoD system. For securing the Mesh these computers are given 10% reward of transaction fees for each block they secure.
Check your NYZO verifier status, search for your nickname or IP
Newcomers can sometimes get confused with how Nyzo verifier lifecycle works in practice or how to join the cycle.
Block files 
One part of the consensus algorithm is the block consolidation process which ensures that a small machine such as a Rock64 Pro or a beefy Raspberry Pi can run a NYZO verifier with little storage space. 1000 blocks are consolidated into 500 Kb of storage space. Very efficient.
51% attack resistance and energy efficiency 
NYZO has a properly designed economic model that relies on time. Therefore, the cost for 51% attacks (relative to market cap) is huge, there is ongoing incentive to participate in the network, and attacks based on computing power (PoW) or ownership of token (PoS) aren't feasible. NYZO uses only a tiny fraction of Bitcoin’s resources while performing the same tasks. 58 000 000 000 kwH - 58 TWh : current BTC power cons. per year vs 36500 kwH - 0.0000365 TWh : current NYZO power cons. per year = 1,589,041 times more efficient and 51% attack resistant.
Roadmap 
NYZO developers have been asked many times for a roadmap. The roadmap is to keep making the code more stable, more robust, and more efficient.
Nyzo development: 15 months of hard work (and beyond)
Scalability 
NYZO doesn’t require any Layer 2 scaling solutions and is able to handle high transaction volumes per second which is only dependent on the performance of the verifiers in the mesh. The block time is 7 seconds and block size is 28 Kb.
Micropay is a lightweight way of using NYZO that shifts as much burden as possible to the person receiving the payment to make it as easy as possible for someone to send small payments. Next step is an API server for Micropay.
Useful guides and articles 
2k verifiers/nodes are in the cycle and 24k verifiers are patiently waiting to join the mesh/cycle. Following video tutorials will explain in detail how to set up your own NYZO mesh verifier node. For more information about set up visit Nyzo DISCORD.
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to setup a NYZO verifier and sentinel on a VPS - video tutorial from Refortuna Analytics
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to set up a Nyzo Verifier on Hetzner - from community website Nyzo.io
Nyzo review and guide how to set up verifier - very detailed review and guide by MyAltcoins.info
Nyzo - Time and diversity as a currency (+ 4 translations here) This article goes into detail about the consensus algorithm and its benefits, it sketches a hypothetical attack scenario and the cost of an attack at this point in time (while the market cap is still low).
Arguments against early entrants This article goes into detail about the early stages of the project, what has happened, how certain events have unfolded and the diversity of the project, it creates a parallel between Bitcoin and NYZO to cover an important aspect of the network in detail.
Time An article going deeper into the time aspect of the network, written by a community member
Ethereum An article comparing NYZO’s consensus algorithm to the development state of Ethereum, written by the same user as the article above.
Bitcoin Yet again an article comparing NYZO, this time with Bitcoin.
Proof of Diversity - A novel solution for limitless blockchain scalability | Micky.com.au
Thoughts on Tor and Nyzo
Developer fund 
The initial developer fund plan can be found here, this has been followed up and the details have changed. The developers effectively own 0.6% of the total supply. So far around 11 million has been “mined” and the remainder is spendable by the network through governed voting, with a minimum amount of votes required for NYZO to be released (51% of the network needs to agree).
IMPORTANT LINKS: 
Official website
Nyzo mobile wallet for Android phones on Google Play - Multilingual support (EN, DE, CN, ES, FR, RU, NL, HR) - developed by ThreeDots Technologies
Nyzo key tool and Web wallet
Nyzo Space - Paper wallet - developed by Angainor Dev
Nyzo DISCORD - There are currently 1600 active members and developers in the discord group with multiple joining every day. Most of the community communicates here. Here is where you’re guaranteed to have a one-on-one with the developers.
GitHub
New Community Forum website (You can get here lots of useful information. If you are ready to build for Nyzo and get paid, please read this article... Nyzo and its protocol which facilitates building)
Chinese Community website NYZO社区
Nyzo Twitter
Nyzo Gang Twitter
Facebook
Telegram
Instagram
Tumblr
Reddit
Bitcointalk
Weibo
QQ: 1007477423
Zedge
NYZO wallpapers for desktop and mobile devices
Trading: 
qTrade
BILAXY
Hotbit
QBTC
Citex
BiHodl


https://preview.redd.it/5ep6vlsj3l341.png?width=2560&format=png&auto=webp&s=40ef27f1c38bb3d4c542cfdfc58faa054ad7cc0b
submitted by Mobilenewsflash to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi 16 versus 32 cluster, whats the benefits with more?

Hey guys! For our school we are currently getting our grants for our project, and I was going to do a Raspberry Pi cluster server. I have already done research on this, so I know that is REALLY not going to be effective, but we want to learn more about super computing. But, I have a huge question. Would there be a huge difference between a 16 cluster and a 32 cluster? Also what kind of programs could I run on this said cluster? Thank you! Also I will be posting pictures, because I think buying 600 dollars worth of Raspberry Pi 2's should be awesome!
submitted by Zvight to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Anyone feel like the Orange Pi's are faster/more reliable than the Raspberry Pi?

So I've been using the Orange Pi's for a while now (I have a bunch of Orange Pi Zero's, but I also have an Orange Pi Zero Plus and an Orange Pi PC2). I'm running Armbian on all of them, and I've been using them for some compute-intensive tasks (no, not Bitcoin mining). I also have a Raspberry Pi Model B, a Raspberry Pi Model 3B, and a Raspberry Pi Model 3B+. And honestly? It seems like I've had nothing but trouble with the Raspberry Pi Model 3's lately. A couple of examples:
I just haven't had this same level of issues with the Orange Pi's. I set them up with what I need, and they just go. Many of them have been online for over 90 days now (probably the last time I power cycled them) without any issues.
On top of that -- I feel like the Orange Pi's perform better than the Raspberry Pi's do. Good example? Just doing a nice sudo apt full-upgrade. The Orange Pi's zip through that much faster than the Raspberry Pi's do.
Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else like you get better performance, better reliability, and better value with Orange Pi's?
submitted by mikaey00 to OrangePI [link] [comments]

A 14-year-old's experience with Bitcoin

First-time poster here, don’t bully me, apologies for the potentially atrocious formatting :) TL;DR at the end
So in the wake of Bitcoin’s explosive rise in value and media attention, I’ve been encouraged by others to share my experience over the past few years as a miner. Here's my story (it's kinda long, you've been warned)

Humble Beginnings

It all started almost three years ago in the beginning of 2015 when Bitcoin flew under my radar. Looking into it, I admittedly wasn’t drawn in because of the decentralisation or the anonymous payments, I was hooked on the idea that anyone could get their hands on some just by running a program and leaving it to do its own thing. I know, how shallow of me. But the idea of making even a bit of money without ‘any work’ was convincing enough for 11-year-old me to do more digging into the matter.
To my disappointment, I soon found out that the era of mining Bitcoins with a PC’s CPU or GPU was long obsolete and instead it was all ASICs at that point.
So that summer, for my twelfth birthday, I got a little ASIC machine for €60, an Antminer U3. This little thing took up less space than a graphics card but could mine at 60 GH/s. Because, at the time, I didn’t have a controller device that could be kept up and running all day long so it could run the program that mined Bitcoin using the U3, I went ahead and got a Raspberry Pi. After setting up the Pi and installing all the necessary stuff (took an awfully long time), I connected it to AntPool and plugged the U3 in. Two days past and the mining pool sent the first Bitcoin I ever received to my wallet (I was using Blockchain.info). It was just 30 cents worth of BTC but I felt a bit of a rush because I was earning a bit of money through this completely new thing and the idea of that was thrilling.
Let’s back up for a second. I just used the term ‘earning’ as if I was profiting, and naive me 2 years ago was no different. In reality, I was at first oblivious to the fact that I was most likely LOSING money overall because of how much energy that little sucker was taking in. But, I was comforted thinking that using that machine was just a practical way of learning about this modern currency and that the loss of several cents’ worth of energy was acceptable in the name of education and learning.
Fast forward ten months to the wonderful summer of 2016. I had recently turned 13 and the Antminer U3 had been running on and off throughout. Various pauses and breaks in mining would be observed, as I had to manually get everything up and running after frequent breaks in the Internet connection. You’d expect my newly-turned-teenage brain to lose interest in Bitcoin as it does with many other gimmicks, but – even surprising myself – I miraculously didn’t. Good thing I maintained interest thinking about it now, not so good at the time for my parents. Why do I say this? I felt like it was time to get a little upgrade in my hardware.

Getting an upgrade

Days passed with me comparing every ASIC miner I could at that price point. It was then I set my eyes upon the Antminer S7 (same folks who did my U3, nice). I had put it up against a plethora of other miners and I figured the S7 was my best bet; the thing costs only about 10 times that of my U3 but could run at 4.73 TH/s, almost 80 times as powerful. The only problem being its power consumption was at 1300 watts, which would put a massive dent in the electricity bill and eliminate any profit I would make. Fortunately, I had a secret weapon up my sleeve – or rather my mum did. She had rented out an office outside our apartment where she would keep files and paperwork. The office’s electricity bill was a flat rate as far as I’m aware and it ended up being my saving grace because it virtually got rid of the “oh no I’m actually going to be losing money because of how much electricity I’m eating up” factor, making this whole hardware upgrade viable.
After convincing my parents, they finally agreed to shell out the requested amount, with the initial investment being paid back with time. I went to a local Bitcoin vendor and purchased 1 BTC for about $665 in cash (sigh yes, I know. $665 dollars). Shortly after, I used about 0.9 BTC to purchase the Antminer S7 and a 1600W power supply for a grand total of $600. The products would be made and shipped from China so I was definitely in for a wait.
A month passes and the package arrives at last. I connected all the wires from the power supply into the S7 and – with great anticipation – I plugged it into the wall to start its first ever run. And what do you know? An extremely loud and high-pitched whirring sound blasted out from the fans on both the power supply as well as the S7. After killing the thing, I questioned my choices. I couldn’t dare put that thing anywhere near my mum’s office in the event it drive everyone in the building absolutely nuts. I was at a loss. However, I soon recovered from my temporarily debilitated state and got working on a solution.
The first idea that came to my mind: change the fans. The stocks fans were by Evercool and spun at around 3000 RPM. The power supply used a small, robust fan that looked like a cube that must’ve spun at extremely high speeds judging by how high the sound it produced was. I got my parents to give me some more funding so I could acquire the replacement fans and I did. Bust. After installation and testing, none of the fans would work. I managed to configure the S7 to connect to my Antpool account and the machine would manage mining for several minutes running at peak performance but ultimately be automatically cut off because of how hot the machine was getting (I’m talking about 80 degrees Celsius kinda hot in that thing). The fans got refunded and I was back to the drawing board.
After combing through some forum posts and videos, I came across this video and a forum post in which people have their mining rigs placed inside a ventilated, muffled cabinet. Undertaking a project like this would be time-consuming and risky but I had no better ideas so I decided to go through with the idea anyway.
Firstly, I sought out a cabinet with suitable dimensions. I managed to get just what I needed at a second-hand IKEA shop. Great. Secondly, I went ahead and acquired some sound-absorbing acoustic foam from a local provider. Fantastic. Finally I had to get a ventilation system going within the cabinet, otherwise, all the hot air would roast the machine alive in there in a bloody mess. With the help of my dad, we found a pair cabinet fans on the Internet that were close to silent but could circulate the air well enough.
Eventually, all the materials came and, with the help of my parents, put everything together. The process took quite long time and we had a couple hiccups along the way, but we got it done and it came out pretty nice.
The moment of truth came and, to my relief, it ran so much quieter than without the cabinet. It was nowhere near silent but it reduced the noise a great deal. Soon after, I got the thing into the office and set everything up from there. Unfortunately, I was forced to underclock it because you could still hear the machine’s whining from outside the thin office door. Gunning the hashrate down about 25% to 3.7TH/s, I could lower the fan speed without risking the machine burning up. Sure, I wasn’t getting the full potential of the machine but I didn’t complain because electricity was not an issue there and it was still a whole lot better than my U3. With it up and running, I could leave it there, periodically checking to see if it was mining on Antpool.

The aftermath

In the months that followed, I was getting a solid $2.5 worth of BTC on daily basis. Half a year later, May of 2017, I had accumulated a satisfactory $600. I thought, “At this rate, I’d be able to pay my parents’ investment back in a few months” (the total investment came close to $900). Bitcoin had risen to over $1500 so I was already over the moon at that point because of how well everything was going. Little did I know…
I hit 0.5 BTC midway through September this year. The price of BTC had dropped after a sudden rise to $5000, but I couldn’t have asked for more. Although I possessed only half the amount of BTC I paid for the machine, its value was over twice that of the initial investment. I thought BTC would level off at around $4000 but nope.
In the month of October, the price skyrocketed. Since September, I had only mined 0.017 BTC but the value was already over $3000. It was just a matter of selling it, but I decided to hodl. Good thing I did.
As of November 5, I have approximately 0.52 BTC mined in total from my S7, valued at $4000. If I were to sell it right now, I’d have a profit of over $3100. And as for my miner, it’s churning out 0.0006 BTC daily, sounds like nothing but it’s still the equivalent of $5 today and I couldn’t be happier, at least with the miner and Bitcoin.
You remember that $665 for 1 BTC that I mentioned earlier? In hindsight, it would’ve been such a better idea to just keep that one Bitcoin and not do anything with it until today (in the interest of making much more money), as I’d theoretically have upwards of $7000. The idea of that still haunts me sometimes if I dwell on it too long but knowing that I’m in possession of an already hefty amount, the pain of it had numbed slightly. It’s not all doom and gloom for me from the exponential increase in Bitcoin’s value, however. Those first $0.3 payments from my humble little U3 all those years ago now are now the equivalent of over $6 today!
Bitcoin and everything it encompasses has been and still is a journey of discovery and an adventure. Looking back, starting with a modest €60 Antminer U3 to having a sum of Bitcoin equivalent to two extremely high-end gaming rigs (first thing I could think of as a comparison, sorry) has been something I can’t really describe. Through the course of the past few years, I’ve learned more about technology, I’ve unexpectedly gotten insight into economics and business and – of course – I’ve made a lot of money (if I decide to stop hodling that is).
Also, props to my parents for keeping an open mind throughout, I know some parents would be horrified at their kids being involved in something that has been used in some less-than-savoury ways and it's great knowing mine have been supportive all the way.
TL;DR got into Bitcoin mining 3 years ago at age 11 with an Antminer U3 that ran at 60 GH/s, got an Antminer S7 (4.73TH/s) and built a sound-muffling, ventilated cabinet for it. Am sat here today with $3000 profit if I decide to sell right now.
submitted by xx_riptide_xx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin June Development Update & Release!

Another Quarter, Another Release! The Groestlcoin production factory has been working overtime as always in order to deliver even more tech to push Groestlcoin mainstream when the time comes.
There have been many new fantastic wallets and exchanges added to Groestlcoins repertoire over the past 3 months so we will re-cap these before moving on to what is new today.

Recap

What's New

Re-forged: Groestlcoin Samourai

Groestlcoin Samourai is a wallet for the streets. A modern Groestlcoin wallet hand-forged to keep your transactions private, your identity masked, and your funds secure. Its main advantages are its extreme portability and is the most secure Groestlcoin mobile HD wallet.
We've built a wallet that Groestlcoin deserves. If you are looking for a wallet that Silicon Valley will never build, the regulators will never allow, and the VC's will never invest in, this is the perfect wallet for you.
![Groestlcoin Samourai Release Video](http://img.youtube.com/vi/i3WU8Tde8XQ/0.jpg)

Head over to the Groestlcoin Samourai Release Page here for the full release announcement.

New: GroestlImage

Groestlimage turns any file into a mnemonic phrase allowing users to generate Groestlcoin private keys and addresses based on the data URI of the provided file. A picture is worth a thousand Groestls.

Features:

Link

https://groestlcoin.org/groestlimage/

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/groestlimage

New: Groestlcoin Core Config Generator

Groestlcoin Core Config Generator is a simple GUI to configure the groestlcoin.conf file – A developers dream tool!
Each configuration option is available via the user interface, grouped by what attributes they affect. For ease of getting started with a new configuration, a variety of preset "node classes" are available on the right-hand-side of the screen. Selecting a preset will load our recommended base configuration for a node fitting that description, at which point you can then tune the configuration at the single option level.

Features

Link

https://config.groestlcoin.org/

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/groestlcoin-core-config-generator

New: Groestlcoin Dumb Block Explorer

Dumb Block Explorer is a trivial block explorer written in a single PHP file. Now everybody can run their own block explorer.

Features

Link

https://www.groestlcoin.org/explore

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/dumb-block-explorer

New: Groestlcoin SMS Push TX

Groestlcoin Simple Push TX is a server to push Groestlcoin transactions via SMS. Now everybody can send new transactions via SMS if the Internet is not usable (i.e. blocked by government entities or becomes otherwise unavailable).

Features

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/smspushtx

Update: Electrum-GRS 3.3.6

Electrum-GRS is Groestlcoins #1 thin-client for Windows, MacOS, Linux and Android, based on a client-server protocol. Supporting multi-sig wallets without the bloat of downloading the entire blockchain.

New Features (Universal)

New Features (Windows, MacOS, Linux)

New Features (Android)

Link

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs/releases/download
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.groestlcoin.electrumgrs

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs
submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
Some great introductions for new users are My first bitcoin, Bitcoin explained and ELI5 Bitcoin. Also, the following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Also have to give mention to Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series. Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute. Bitcoin statistics can be found here, here and here. Developer resources can be found here, here and here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here. Potential upcoming protocol improvements here. Scaling resources here. The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!), and of course Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper that started it all! :)
Key properties of bitcoin